LinkedIn asked me to contribute to a discussion on “What topics, ideas and conversations do you think will define 2019?”

Judith Cushman All Posts by Date, Community 0 Comments

judith cushman associates bellevue washington wa seattle area eastside millenials issue with older generationAnswer: In my field which is the Communications & Marketing search area I see a clash I call, “When an irresistible force meets an immovable object.” Younger Gen X professionals and older Millennials are hitting a critical point in their careers (late thirties to 40+) as they attempt to move into leadership positions.
Here’s LinkedIn’s request and my response.

FROM LINKED IN: “We’ve noticed that you’ve been posting some great stuff on LinkedIn lately and wanted to thank you for taking the time to share thought-provoking ideas and engage in conversations. The professional community benefits from insights and perspectives from people like you.

Heading into 2019, we couldn’t be more excited to look ahead to the Big Ideas that will shape your industry and workplace. We talked to business leaders about what they’re watching, including everything from a potential economic slowdown to the rise of remote work. You can check out our collection of the 50 Big Ideas for the year ahead.

Now, we want to know your predictions. What topics, ideas and conversations do you think will define 2019? Weigh in — and see what others are saying.”

FROM JUDY CUSHMAN: I see a trend and a clash I call, “When an irresistible force meets an immovable object.

Younger Gen X professionals and older Millennials are hitting a critical point in their careers (late thirties to 40+) as they attempt to move into leadership positions. Hiring managers (a decade or more older) are insisting they behave like good corporate players (similar to themselves.) The values are different and incompatible.

Millennials, for example, will find the way they have negotiated for prior jobs or were recruited (and were considered highly desirable so no need to adjust terms) isn’t how the game is played at these levels. They simply can’t focus first on what’s in it for them, secondly, what they want in the way of benefits and perhaps, lastly what they can offer an employer. The sense of, “I want it now and I want to know it all so I can decide if I want what you are offering” will get them removed consideration. The point is, it can’t be all about me; it must be about meeting the needs of the organization, thinking about strategy and future contributions.

Meanwhile, senior hiring managers find they are lagging behind in understanding how to communicate effectively with the generations who are making purchasing and policy (e.g. voting) decisions—including the Gen Zs. As much as they have the authority to hire based on their values, they need the expertise and insights of these up and coming Millennials and Gen X professionals.

What and who are going to “give” in 2019 to make this a synergistic union?

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